Encompas a lancé une série mensuelle de sensibilisation et de communication en matière de santé mentale. La série alterne chaque mois entre des journées portes ouvertes virtuelles et une série de conférenciers. Les présentations de la série de conférences fourniront une éducation et des solutions sur des sujets portant sur la guérison et la résilience et les journées portes ouvertes se concentreront sur le partage des mises à jour du programme Encompas

The next session in the Série de sensibilisation et de communication sur la santé mentale is May 25, 2022 from 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM ET.
Featuring Dr. Glenn J. Landry, Sleep Expert – A Three-Part Elite Sleep Series: Session #2 – Why can’t I Sleep? Download the information booklet by clicking here. Click here to register for the series.


Click here to watch a recording of the first Dr. Landry Sleep Series Session – Sleep Matters! (April 27).

Enregistrements des webinaires

Session de conférence avec Françoise Mathieu, enregistrée le 28 avril 2021 à 10 h HE.


Session de conférence avec le Dr Rakesh Jetly, Carl Dalton et Kaleigh Smith, enregistrée le 26 mai 2021 à 10 h HE.


Session de conférence avec Brian Knowler, enregistrée le 23 juin 2021 à 10 h HE.


Session de conférence avec Julie Christiansen, enregistrée le 22 septembre 2021 à 10 h HE.


Session de conférence avec Dan Bowers, enregistrée le 27 octobre 2021 à 10 h HE.


Speaker session featuring Shaun Ouellette, recorded on Nov 24, 2021 at 10am ET.


Speaker session featuring Alyson Schafer, recorded on Jan 26, 2022 at 10am ET.

Speaker session featuring Emily Zufelt, recorded on Feb 23, 2022 at 10am ET.

Speaker session featuring Mary-Anne Bilodeau and Jacqueline Sbeyti from OPP Beyond the Blue, recorded on Mar 23, 2022 at 10am ET. 

Speaker session featuring Dr. Glenn J. Landry, Sleep Expert, recorded on April 27, 2022 at 1:00pm ET.



Q&A from the Session

Does the sleep count for good sleep if using medical help?

As I explained in our first session, drugs that impact the neurotransmitters systems involved in sleep will alter sleep architecture, which may not be healthy long term. We will discuss this further in our next session.

How does taking Gravol effect every night effect sleep cycles?   What about Melatonin or Valerian?  And Magnesium?

Stay tuned for our next talk for the impact of drugs/sleep aids on sleep architecture.

Will it help to have a nap between 1pm and 4pm before going to a 12-hour night shift?

Yes, absolutely, naps can be beneficial when properly timed. We will discuss the importance of naps in our final session.

So, after a 30 years of shift work and sleep deprived.  Can this damage be reversed for Alzheimer’s issues?

As I mentioned in our first session, it would be irresponsible of me to say you need better sleep health if there wasn’t a way for you to achieve better sleep health. If you are chronically sleep deprived, we can help you improve your sleep health status… and the next two sessions will get you well on your way.

If we have worked shift work for under 10 years, but then change jobs and no longer have to work shift work anymore, is it possible to undo the damage?

It is possible to, with dedicated effort, improve sleep health and become an elite sleeper? Please see my answer to the previous question. The short answer is yes!what is the impact of blue light on sleep patterns (cell phone)? Blue light at night suppresses melatonin levels, which impairs sleep readiness and impairs cancer fightning mechanisms.

I wake up at 2:30 every night and it takes at least half an hour to fall back asleep.  Is there a logical explanation for that?

Sleep changes as a normal course of aging, and what you are describing is part of that process. We will cover this topic in great detail in our next session. You will learn that these changes are normal, but they are not healthy, and they need not be inevitable.

So if we are all shift workers and I would suggest that some of us are more than others…..ie.actually working shifts as it is a required work schedule….how do we best protect ourselves?

Yes, indeed, the degree to which we are “shiftworkers” varies from person to person. The first session focused on why sleep matters. Our next session will explore the drivers of poor sleep and our final session will cover the strategies/tools you can employ to improve your sleep health. Stay tuned!

What can you do when you are on shift works?

Sorry to keep saying this, but we will cover this material in our final session.

So as long as we are awake for 16 hours and aim for an 8 hour sleep window, that time can be shifted to account for early risers, such as myself, or people who like to sleep in?

The short answer is yes. If your brain and body are ready for sleep at the time you’ve scheduled sleep, you will be able to get the sleep you need. We cover this aspect of sleep health in great detail in our final session.

My sleep schedule is typically from 8:00pm-4:00am and my Fitbit patterns are very similar to yours. I have read that a warm bath, hot tub, infrared sauna before bed can improve sleep by raising core temperature and inducing sleepiness. Is this true?

Yes, increasing your core body temperature can improve sleep readiness. We will learn more about this topic in our next two sessions.

What about going to bed early, and getting up early? Specifically, I wake at 5am to workout, and try to get to bed by 9.  Can this affect sleep quality as well?

Changing your sleep schedule will definitely alter sleep readiness and disrupt sleep architecture.

Can you get too much sleep?

Great question! For adults, sleeping more than 9 hours and still feeling the need for more sleep is an indicator of poor health. We will cover this topic in greater detail next session.

Does reading before sleep help clear the head?

Reading before bed can be part of a healthy bedtime routine, but only if we properly manage exposure to blue light in the couple hours before bed. We cover this topic in our final session.

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